Dirty Little Secrets of the Solar Industry

Your roof could leak as a result from a poor quality solar installation. Makello protects you from that.

The solar industry is in extreme competition with narrow margins.  Companies cut corners in workmanship quality and balance of system, to match lowest bids, while salespeople oversize systems to maximize commissions.  Whether you buy too much, or compromise the waterproofing to get to the lowest cost/watt, either way, you’re all wet.  Makello has a better way.

Optimal Cost Savings is a new concept for the solar industry.  The goal of 100% solar production vs use is an outdated strategy that does not address the current and future Time-Of-Use utility rates and the Net Energy Metering agreement with the utility.

Makello's Optimal Cost Savings is based on how you plan to use power.
Optimal Cost Savings is based on how you plan to use power.

In San Diego, utility electric cost savings is dependent on the time of day that power is produced and consumed.  Since every home has a unique pattern of utility electric use, an effective cost savings strategy must match solar production and energy storage to the historical and projected time-of-use interval data.  A detailed trade-off study of available site orientations and equipment options is necessary to identify the incremental costs and return on investment.

Makello’s Energy Analysis determines the optimal system for fastest payback, lowest cost and highest quality.  In almost all cases, the optimal sized solar system is much smaller and less expensive than you would expect.

Before you buy, ask yourself:

  • Does a large system size change the home aesthetics? Can I afford the upfront costs?  Will I relocate before the loan or lease ends?  Will the new home buyer value the energy production?
  • Have I received a proposal that offers alternative sizes and orientations to produce and store power for when I use it?  Has anyone provided an analysis which identifies the incremental cost factor, payback and return on investment for each additional module greater than optimal?
  • Would I trust a contractor or subcontractor, without proof of workmanship quality on my installation, knowing that the permit inspection does not include key areas on or under the roof, or below the array, where unseen conditions could void manufacturer warranties, compromise the roof structural integrity, or risk fire or roof leak, possibly years later?

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